• 24-Jan-2023
Lightrun Team
Author Lightrun Team
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This article is about fixing [v6] [Bug] No routes matched warning is too noisy in Remix Run React Router

[v6] [Bug]: “No routes matched” warning is too noisy in Remix Run React Router

Lightrun Team
Lightrun Team
24-Jan-2023

Explanation of the problem

The version of React Router being used is 6.0.0-beta.5.

Recently, a warning message has been added when no <Route> in a <Routes> matches the location. To avoid this warning, all possible routes must be fully described within the <Routes>. However, if a code block similar to the following is used:

<Routes>
  <Route path="/login" element={<Login />} />
  <Route path="/about" element={<About />} />
</Routes>
{userIsAuthenticated && (
  <FancyMenu>
    <Routes>
      <Route path="/feed" element={<Feed />} />
      <Route path="/profile" element={<Profile />} />
    </Routes>
  </FancyMenu>
)}

It will result in the warning firing every time, as one of the groups of <Routes> will not include a match. Additionally, wrapping everything in a single <Routes> is no longer a viable solution, as <Routes> will no longer render non-route children, as mentioned in issues #8033, #8066, and #8092.

The expected behavior is that this warning should not be necessary and could lead to alert fatigue. There are legitimate cases where having no match is intentional and if the contents of any <Routes> should always match any location that is expected to occur, this should be clearly documented and a reason for it should be provided. However, the actual behavior is that the warning is continually firing on patterns which are considered to be valid by the developer.

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Problem solution for [v6] [Bug]: “No routes matched” warning is too noisy in Remix Run React Router

One solution to this issue is to add a switch component to your router and set the exact prop on each route. This will ensure that only one route is matched at a time, and the warning will only appear when no routes match. The exact prop tells React Router to only match the path exactly, which prevents it from matching on any subpaths. By using this prop, you can ensure that only one route is matched at a time, and the warning will only appear when no routes match.

Another solution could be to set the strict prop to false on the Switch component, this will make the route matching more relaxed, and also make sure that the path prop of the Route component is set to path={/} . This will make the router to match the route with any path that starts with a ‘/’ . This will prevent the warning from appearing when a subpath is matched.

Another approach is to wrap your Route component inside a Suspense component and set a fallback component to it to handle the “no routes matched” case. This way, you can control what component is displayed when no routes match, instead of showing the warning. It also allows you to handle the case in a more elegant way, by displaying a custom component or a loading spinner. This could be especially useful in cases where you are using lazy loading or code splitting in your app.

Other popular problems with React Router

Problem: No routes matched warning is too noisy

One common problem with React Router is that the “No routes matched” warning can be too noisy, appearing frequently when navigating between routes. This can be particularly frustrating when using dynamic routes or when using subpaths.

Solution:

To solve this problem, you can add a switch component to your router and set the exact prop on each route. This will ensure that only one route is matched at a time, and the warning will only appear when no routes match. Here is an example of how you can use the exact prop in your routes:

import { Switch, Route } from 'react-router-dom'

function App() {
  return (
    <Switch>
      <Route exact path='/' component={Home} />
      <Route exact path='/about' component={About} />
      <Route exact path='/contact' component={Contact} />
    </Switch>
  )
}

Problem: Handling 404 errors

Another common problem with React Router is handling 404 errors when a user navigates to a non-existent route. By default, React Router does not provide a way to handle these errors, and the user will simply see a blank page or the “No routes matched” warning.

Solution:

You can handle 404 errors by using the switch component and providing a catch-all route. By using the path='*' you can match any route that has not been matched before. Here is an example of how you can use a catch-all route to handle 404 errors:

import { Switch, Route } from 'react-router-dom'

function App() {
  return (
    <Switch>
      <Route exact path='/' component={Home} />
      <Route exact path='/about' component={About} />
      <Route exact path='/contact' component={Contact} />
      <Route path='*' component={NotFound} />
    </Switch>
  )
}

Problem: Lazy loading routes

Another common problem with React Router is lazy loading routes. When an application has many routes, it can lead to slow load times and a large bundle size. Lazy loading routes can help to mitigate this issue by only loading the components that are needed for a particular route.

Solution:

You can use the React.lazy() function to lazy load routes. It allows you to load a component lazily when a route is accessed. Here is an example of how you can use React.lazy() to load a component lazily:

import { Switch, Route, Suspense } from 'react-router-dom'
const Home = React.lazy(() => import('./Home'))
const About = React.lazy(() => import('./About'))
const Contact = React.lazy(() => import('./Contact'))

function App() {
  return (
    <Suspense fallback={<div>Loading...</div>}>
      <Switch>
        <Route exact path='/' component={Home} />
        <Route exact path='/about' component={About} />
        <Route exact path='/contact' component={Contact} />
      </Switch>
    </Suspense>
  )
}

A brief introduction to React Router

Remix Run React Router is a client-side routing library for React applications. It allows developers to declaratively map URL paths to components, allowing for intuitive navigation and dynamic updates to the user interface. The library utilizes the React Hooks API to manage the routing state within the application and provides a set of hooks for accessing and modifying that state, such as useParams and useNavigate.

Remix Run React Router also supports dynamic routing, where a portion of the URL path is treated as a variable and passed as a prop to the corresponding component. This allows for the creation of dynamic, parameterized routes that can be used to display different content based on the values in the URL. Additionally, the library provides a Link component that can be used to navigate to different routes within the application, and a Redirect component for redirecting users to a different route. All of these features make Remix Run React Router an excellent choice for building complex, feature-rich React applications with dynamic navigation.

Most popular use cases for React Router

  1. Client-side routing: Remix Run React Router can be used to declaratively map URL paths to React components, providing a seamless navigation experience for users and dynamic updates to the user interface. This allows developers to create complex, feature-rich React applications with intuitive navigation.
  2. Dynamic routing: Remix Run React Router supports dynamic routing, where a portion of the URL path is treated as a variable and passed as a prop to the corresponding component. This allows for the creation of dynamic, parameterized routes that can be used to display different content based on the values in the URL. This feature can be implemented using code block like
<Router>
  <Route path="/users/:userId" component={UserProfile} />
</Router>
  1. Navigation and Redirection: Remix Run React Router provides a Link component that can be used to navigate to different routes within the application, and a Redirect component for redirecting users to a different route. This makes it easy to build complex, feature-rich React applications with dynamic navigation.
<Link to="/about">About</Link>
<Redirect to="/login" />

These features make Remix Run React Router a powerful tool for building React applications with dynamic navigation and client-side routing.

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