• 22-Jan-2023
Lightrun Team
Author Lightrun Team
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Error when [Bug]: [v6] useNavigate() doesn’t navigate to the same route, but with different param in Remix-run React Router

Lightrun Team
Lightrun Team
22-Jan-2023

Explanation of the problem

Problem: When using React Router v6 and HashRouter, the component does not re-render after calling the navigate() function. The location updates as expected, but the component remains unchanged.

Steps to reproduce:

  1. Use HashRouter in your React application
  2. Define routes using <Routes> and <Route> components
  3. Navigate to a page with a dynamic path, such as “/questions/abc”
  4. Attempt to navigate to a new page with a different dynamic path, such as “/questions/123” using the navigate() function.

Expected behavior: The location updates to the new path, and the component re-renders to display the updated information.

Actual behavior: The location updates to the new path, but the component does not re-render. This issue only occurs when the current location is already a dynamic path, such as “/questions/{id}”.

Example code:

import { useNavigate, Routes, Route } from 'react-router-dom';

function App() {
  const navigate = useNavigate();

  useEffect(() => {
    document.addEventListener('paste', (e) => {
      const clipboardData = e.clipboardData;
      const pastedText = clipboardData?.getData('text');

      if (pastedText && pastedText.startsWith('https://stackoverflow.com/questions/')) {
        const questionId = pastedText.replace('https://stackoverflow.com/questions/', '').split('/')[0];

        navigate(`/questions/${questionId}`);
      }
    });
  }, []);

  return (
    <Routes>
      <Route path="/" element={<Questions

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Problem solution for error when [Bug]: [v6] useNavigate() doesn’t navigate to the same route, but with different param in Remix-run React Router

When using React Router v6, there is a known issue where calling the useNavigate hook to navigate to the same route with a different parameter does not re-render the component as expected. This is a known bug and a fix has not been released yet.

The root of this issue is that React Router v6 does not re-render a component if the path and the component remain the same, even if the route parameter has changed. This can be observed when calling the useNavigate hook to navigate to a new route that has the same path but a different parameter. The URL will update, but the component will not re-render.

One way to work around this issue is to use the useEffect hook to manually re-render the component upon a change in the route parameter. An example of this can be seen in the provided code block:

import { useEffect, useState } from 'react';
import { useParams, useLocation } from 'react-router-dom';

export function MyComponent() {
  const location = useLocation();
  const [, setRenderCount] = useState(0);
  const { id } = useParams();

  useEffect(() => {
    setRenderCount(count => count + 1);
  }, [location.pathname, id]);

  return (
    <div>
      <h1>My Component</h1>
      <p>Render count: {renderCount}</p>
    </div>
  );
}

This code block is using the useEffect hook to watch for changes in the location’s pathname and the route parameter (in this case, the id parameter). When either of these values change, the component’s render count is incremented, forcing a re-render of the component.

Another way to work around this issue is by using the withRouter higher-order component and the useEffect hook. This can be seen in the following code block.

import { useEffect } from 'react';
import { withRouter } from 'react-router-dom';

function MyComponent({ history, location }) {
  useEffect(() => {
    history.listen(() => {
      if (location.pathname === '/questions/:id') {
        window.location.reload();
      }
    });
  }, [history, location]);

  return (
    <div>
      <h1>My Component</h1>
    </div>
  );
}

export default withRouter(My

Other popular problems with Remix-run React Router

Problem: Inconsistency in navigation behavior when using useNavigate() in React Router v6.

When navigating to the same route but with different parameters using useNavigate() function, the component does not re-render as expected. This issue is specific to React Router v6 and can cause confusion and unexpected behavior in the application.

Solution:

A possible solution is to use the useEffect hook and the useLocation hook to manually update the component state and trigger a re-render upon navigation.

Code block:

import { useEffect, useState } from 'react';
import { useNavigate, useLocation } from 'react-router-dom';

function QuestionDetailsPage() {
  const navigate = useNavigate();
  const location = useLocation();
  const [questionId, setQuestionId] = useState(null);

  useEffect(() => {
    setQuestionId(location.pathname.split('/').pop());
  }, [location]);

  return (
    <div>
      <h1>Question: {questionId}</h1>
      <button onClick={() => navigate(`/questions/${questionId + 1}`)}>Next</button>
    </div>
  );
}

Problem: Confusion between the different types of routers available in React Router.

React Router offers three types of routers, namely BrowserRouter, HashRouter, and MemoryRouter, each with their own specific use cases and behaviors. This can lead to confusion and unexpected behavior when using the wrong type of router for a particular situation.

Solution:

It is important to understand the differences between the three types of routers and choose the appropriate one for your use case. For example, if you want to use client-side routing and want the router to handle the history of your application, use BrowserRouter. If you want to use server-side rendering, then MemoryRouter is best suited.

Code block:

import { BrowserRouter, HashRouter, MemoryRouter } from 'react-router-dom';

function App() {
  return (
    <BrowserRouter>
      {/* Your application code */}
    </BrowserRouter>
  );
}

A brief introduction to Remix-run React Router

Remix-run React Router is a library that provides routing capabilities for React applications. It allows developers to define and navigate between different routes within the application, which are typically mapped to different components or pages. The library is built on top of the React ecosystem and works seamlessly with other popular React libraries and tools. One of the key features of React Router is its flexibility and ability to handle different types of routing, including browser and hash routing, dynamic parameters, and programmatic navigation.

A key benefit of using React Router is that it abstracts away the complexities of handling browser navigation, allowing developers to focus on building the logic and functionality of their application. This improves the developer experience and enables them to create scalable, maintainable, and performant applications.

Most popular use cases for Remix-run React Router

 

  1. React Router can be used to handle client-side routing in a React application. This allows for navigation between different pages or views of the app without requiring a full page reload.
import { BrowserRouter, Route } from 'react-router-dom';

function App() {
  return (
    <BrowserRouter>
      <Route exact path="/" component={HomePage} />
      <Route path="/about" component={AboutPage} />
    </BrowserRouter>
  )
}
  1. It also provides features such as dynamic route matching and URL parsing, allowing for the passing of parameters between routes and the ability to extract information from the current URL.
import { useParams } from 'react-router-dom';

function ProductPage() {
  let { productId } = useParams();
  // productId will have the value of the id parameter in the URL
  return <div>Product: {productId}</div>;
}
  1. React Router also allows for the creation of protected routes and the handling of redirects, making it easier to implement authentication and authorization in a React application.
import { Route, Redirect } from 'react-router-dom';

function PrivateRoute({ component: Component, ...rest }) {
  return (
    <Route
      {...rest}
      render={props =>
        isAuthenticated ? (
          <Component {...props} />
        ) : (
          <Redirect
            to={{
              pathname: '/login',
              state: { from: props.location }
            }}
          />
        )
      }
    />
  );
}
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