• 24-Jan-2023
Lightrun Team
Author Lightrun Team
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This article is about fixing Next.JS / React 18 - Hydration Error in cookpete React Player

Next.JS / React 18 – Hydration Error in cookpete React Player

Lightrun Team
Lightrun Team
24-Jan-2023

Explanation of the problem

When using Server-side rendering (SSR) with Next.JS, an error may occur when importing react-player unless it is loaded on the client-side using dynamic/no-ssr or useEffect. The error is caused by hydration, which occurs when the initial UI rendered on the server does not match the UI rendered on the client.

Steps to Reproduce:

  • Import react-player in Next.JS application
  • Follow typical implementation instructions for react-player
  • Run the application with SSR enabled
  • Observe the hydration error

Code example of improper wrapping of tags:

// Incorrect
<p>
  <div>
    <react-player />
  </div>
</p>

// Correct
<div>
  <react-player />
</div>

Code example of lazy loading of modules

// Incorrect
import LazyModule from './LazyModule';

<LazyModule />

// Correct
import { Suspense } from 'react';
import LazyModule from './LazyModule';

<Suspense fallback={<div>Loading...</div>}>
  <LazyModule />
</Suspense>

It’s important to check the above-described scenarios in the codebase and also updating the react and react-dom packages to the latest version. You can also refer the following thread on Stack Overflow (https://stackoverflow.com/questions/71706064/react-18-hydration-failed-because-the-initial-ui-does-not-match-what-was-render) for more solutions to related issues.

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Problem solution for Next.JS / React 18 – Hydration Error in cookpete React Player

The problem of using Server-side rendering (SSR) with ReactPlayer is that it may cause a hydration error unless it is loaded on the client-side using dynamic/no-ssr or useEffect. This is because SSR does not match the UI rendered on the client. However, as mentioned in the first answer, there is a workaround for this issue by using Next.js dynamic imports to lazy-load the player. This approach is mentioned by @inderrr in the comment, which is to use the following code:

import dynamic from 'next/dynamic';
const ReactPlayer = dynamic(() => import('react-player/lazy'), { ssr: false });

This code imports the ReactPlayer component and sets ssr to false, this will make sure the component does not get rendered on the server side.

Another workaround that is mentioned in the second answer is to check for the window object and only render the ReactPlayer component if it exists, using the following code:

const Component: React.FC<SomeProps> = ({url}) =>{
  const [hasWindow, setHasWindow] = useState(false);
  useEffect(() => {
    if (typeof window !== "undefined") {
      setHasWindow(true);
    }
  }, []);
  return (
    <>
      {hasWindow && <ReactPlayer url={url} />}
    </>
  )

This approach allows you to check for the existence of the window object and only render the component if it exists.

In general, it is important to note that ReactPlayer should be SS

Other popular problems with cookpete React Player

Problem: Error “Failed to compile” or “Module not found”

This problem occurs when the user tries to run the command “npm start” or “yarn start” to start the development server for a React Player project. The error message “Failed to compile” or “Module not found” appears, indicating that there is a problem with the modules or dependencies of the project. This issue can be caused by a variety of reasons such as missing modules, mismatched versions of modules, or incorrect file or folder structure.

Solution:

One possible solution to this problem is to run the command “npm install” or “yarn install” to install any missing modules or dependencies. This command will look at the package.json file and install any modules or dependencies that are listed but not currently installed on the local machine. If that doesn’t work, another solution is to check the file and folder structure of the project to ensure that everything is in the correct place. It may also be helpful to check the versions of the modules and dependencies to ensure that they are compatible with each other.

Problem: Audio syncing issues

Some users have reported that the audio and video in the React Player component are not synced correctly. This can cause the audio to be out of sync with the video, resulting in a poor user experience.

Solution:

One solution to this issue is to ensure that the audio and video tracks are correctly encoded and synced before being added to the React Player component. Additionally, using a more robust video player library such as Video.js or HLS.js can help to improve audio syncing.

Problem: Limited support for older browsers

The React Player component may not be compatible with older browsers. This can lead to issues with video playback and other functionality, resulting in a poor user experience for users who are still using older browsers.

Solution:

The React Player component may not be compatible with older browsers. This can lead to issues with video playback and other functionality, resulting in a poor user experience for users who are still using older browsers.

A brief introduction to cookpete React Player

The Cookpete React Player is a JavaScript library that allows developers to easily embed video players in their React applications. The library is built using the React JavaScript library and provides a simple, customizable interface for displaying and controlling video playback. The player supports a wide range of video formats and is designed to work seamlessly with both desktop and mobile devices.

The Cookpete React Player is highly configurable and can be customized to meet the specific needs of a project. Developers can customize the player’s appearance by specifying custom CSS styles, and can also configure the player to include features such as captions, full-screen playback, and adaptive streaming. The library also includes a number of built-in event handlers that can be used to respond to user interactions, such as play, pause, and seeking. This allows developers to create a user experience that is tailored to the needs of their specific application.

Most popular use cases for cookpete React Player

  1. Embedding video players in React applications: The Cookpete React Player can be used to easily embed video players in React-based web applications. This allows developers to create a seamless video playback experience within their application, without the need for extensive custom coding.
  2. Customizing the video player’s appearance: The Cookpete React Player provides a number of customization options for developers to adjust the appearance of the player, such as custom CSS styles. This allows developers to match the player’s appearance to the look and feel of their application.
  3. Implementing events and actions: The Cookpete React Player includes a number of built-in event handlers that can be used to respond to user interactions, such as play, pause, and seeking. This allows developers to create a user experience that is tailored to the needs of their specific application. For example, you can add a code block like this to handle the play event:
<CookpeteReactPlayer
   onPlay={() => console.log("Video is playing")}
   ...
/>

This will log “Video is playing” to the console when the video starts playing.

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